Page 2 of 2

Re: Orgasm as treatment and/or cause

Posted: Tue Jul 09, 2019 2:15 am
by Rustsmith
XenMan, here is a link to a paper published last year by Dr Ferre at the US National Institute of Health. It ties iron to dopamine and glutamate receptor performance and appears to have correctly predicted a totally new class of RLS drugs that are currently undergoing double blind clinical trials. The paper was written for RLS researchers, so it is a tough read for lay people. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnins.2017.00722/full

This is a little bit easier read and is less scientific since it was prepared by Dr Ferre as an editorial. You can only read the first page, but the second page doesn't add much more other than a comment about the dipyridamole clinical trial that is currently underway. https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/caff.2019.0001?journalCode=caff

Re: Orgasm as treatment and/or cause

Posted: Tue Jul 09, 2019 4:50 am
by XenMan
Rustsmith wrote:XenMan, here is a link to a paper published last year by Dr Ferre at the US National Institute of Health.


I stand corrected on this and the pathways observed. I sound appropriately like the voice of doom, but history has shown that conditions that aren't identified with a mechanism and treated successfully quickly...well, very rarely are.

There is a perplexing paradox of no ability to diagnose RLS, anyone who says oral test or sleep study will be shouted down, yet there are some biomarkers that are unusual. Meanwhile there is no treatment that seems connected to any consistent mechanism.

I hope I'm wrong and the linked paper is successful for something, but I read nothing with too many assumed and unproven assumptions.

"Altered dopaminergic function seems to play an important role in PLMS, which is empirically supported by the significant therapeutic response to L-dopa and dopamine receptor agonists, such as pramipexole and ropinirole". Wrong and unscientific, is an infection due to a lack of antibiotics? What causes the low dopamine, does dopamine impact sleep, why does it impact sensations of the legs. No need answer these , we have empirical evidence...

"A magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging study in subjects with RLS showed a significant increase in the thalamic concentration of glutamate (measured by the proxy variable Glx, which represents glutamate plus glutamine), which correlated with the time spent awake during the sleep period)" This was the result of not sleeping, not the cause of not sleeping.

I don't have enough time to rip all of it apart, but it is disappointing rubbish.

Sorry, if I'm the only one that can see a problem with this, it is my time to say goodbye.

Good luck everyone,