CPAP

Please share your experiences, successes, and failures in using non-drug therapies for RLS/WED (methods of relief that don't involve swallowing or injecting anything), including compression, heat, light, stretches, acupuncture, etc. Also under this heading, medical interventions that don't involve the administration of a medicine to the body (eg. varicose-vein operations, deep-brain stimulation). [This forum contains Topics started prior to 2009 that deal with Non-prescription Medicines, Supplements, & Diet.]
badnights
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Re: CPAP

Postby badnights » Sun Nov 29, 2015 2:58 pm

How do I find a true "sleep doctor" and not just a neurologist who too quickly assumes apnea and prescribes a CPAP?
There are actually three types of sleep doctor; Steve mentioned two, those who enter the field from a neurology specialty and those who enter from pulmonology, but there are also those who enter from psychiatry. Psychiatrists are medical doctors with all the training that entails. Any of the three (or even any other doctor) can learn enough to become a sleep medicine specialist. Unfortunately, as you;ve seen, not all actually learn the way we'd like them to.
Beth - Wishing you all restful sleep tonight
WED/RLS AUGMENTATION:
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=6532&p=61601#p61601
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ViewsAskew
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Re: CPAP

Postby ViewsAskew » Mon Nov 30, 2015 11:50 am

I remember calling a list of over 30 doctors who supposedly treated RLS. This was after several bad experiences. I asked the nurses questions - they knew quite a bit. Some of the nurses told me to try other doctors, in fact. I narrowed it to three. One was knowledgeable but a true arrogant jerk. The next was very knowledgeable, but she refused to use opioids and at the time, it was the only way we knew of to treat augmentation. At that point, I just worked with my GP, who was much more open to helping me and who would listen to Dr B.

It really is often much harder than it should be.
Ann - Take what you need, leave the rest

Managing Your RLS

Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation, and are not medical advice.

bobkat49
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Re: CPAP

Postby bobkat49 » Wed Aug 24, 2016 4:36 pm

I just started with a C Pap machine, after being dianosed with sleep apnea. The doctor assures me that it will (at least partially) relieve my RLS! He says the two are related. (I would have never guessed that I had sleep apnea. Apparently the "profile" of being oveweight and old and having a thick neck is a myth.) My sleep study showed 17 episodes per hour ( of apnea)! So hopefully the C Pap machine will work. :) PS I've had RLS for about 10 years, and am on Mirapex -- but realize that my days of relief from that drug are numbered.

Rustsmith
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Re: CPAP

Postby Rustsmith » Wed Aug 24, 2016 5:50 pm

I just started with a C Pap machine, after being dianosed with sleep apnea. The doctor assures me that it will (at least partially) relieve my RLS! He says the two are related. (I would have never guessed that I had sleep apnea. Apparently the "profile" of being oveweight and old and having a thick neck is a myth.) My sleep study showed 17 episodes per hour ( of apnea)! So hopefully the C Pap machine will work


A number of us use CPAP machines. I don't know that I would say that my machine has helped my RLS, but my wife appreciates the fact that I am no long snoring all night.

Just as we are beginning to think that there may be different varieties of RLS, the sleep doctors are starting to find that there are probably different types of sleep apnea. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is currently the most commonly diagnosed and is the one where the "profile" is an overweight male with a thick neck. If you saw the Foundation video "Stephen's Story", you will know that I fit none of that. The type of sleep apnea that I was diagnosed with is called Upper Airway Restriction Syndrome (UARS). The profile for UARS is a slight female with a thin neck and a narrow jaw as well as a few other physical features. I fit all but the female part. CPAP hasn't been found to work as well with UARS as it does with OSA. If you have the results of your study, UARS is characterized by a high number of hypopneas and respiratory restrictions, but few obstructive apneas. The minimum oxygen saturation level with UARS is generally greater than 92% where OSA is usually below 85% and sometimes way below that.

Finally, don't expect immediate results with a CPAP. It can take a few weeks to get used to sleeping with a hose attached to your face but most of us adjust to it eventually. :D
Steve

Augmentation Evaluation http://bb.rls.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=9005

Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation, and are not medical advice.


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