Sleeping Arrangements

Share how living with this disease can and does impact your relationships. How do you cope? What questions to you have?
StirCrazy
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jan 13, 2018 5:27 pm

Sleeping Arrangements

Postby StirCrazy » Sat Jan 13, 2018 7:12 pm

Um, you all might just politely ask me to leave this group, and I will if you do, because I am not the Kicker but the person who loves him and is struggling to find a way to keep our relationship going. I'm here out of desperation. So, maybe, you could give me some help before asking me to find another place to get help/fellowship... Out of the goodness of his heart (because he doesn't want to kick or make noise or wake me by getting in & out of bed), he sleeps 99% of the time on the couch which he also swears is best for his broken sleep. I am constantly using logic to persuade my heart and body but I am lonely and depressed - I want him in bed with me. Crazy as it may sound to you, we have a king bed and his movements do not bother me at all (e.g., wake me), in fact, because I have PTSD, I am reassured to know that he is there. I miss him very much but I do not want him to be "miserable" (his words). I really don't know what to do; he will not go to the doctor, take meds, etc.

Rustsmith
Moderator
Posts: 2743
Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2013 9:31 pm
Location: Pueblo, Colorado

Re: Sleeping Arrangements

Postby Rustsmith » Sat Jan 13, 2018 7:30 pm

StirCrazy, you are very welcome here and your question is something that all of us have had to deal with. The fact that you have sought us out and are asking for help is something that all of us respect very highly.

Although most of us can relate to your husband, I can also relate to your situation. My wife has MS and frequently has to get up in the middle of the night. I will often find that she spent most of the night on our couch for fear that she was going to disturb me.

Although many end up sleeping in different rooms, our solution was to buy a split king bed. It is two super twin mattresses that we push together into a king. This way we have the best of both worlds. Both of us can toss and turn as much as we need without bothering the other because our beds are not physically linked. However, we also have the closeness of sleeping in the same bed (sort of). The only thing that we have had to get used to is the crack between the beds when they are being used for something other than sleeping. For that, I find myself continually pushing the two mattresses back together.
Steve

Augmentation Evaluation http://bb.rls.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=9005

Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation, and are not medical advice.

debbluebird
Posts: 1736
Joined: Mon May 21, 2012 3:27 pm

Re: Sleeping Arrangements

Postby debbluebird » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:53 pm

Keep reassuring him, that he is not bothering you. See if you can keep him with you a week, to see how you feel. Then tell him. Good luck
My husband and I sleep in two rooms. We just couldn't sleep together. It is not just my legs, but his pain keeps him awake, when I need to sleep. We are fine. He kept the queen bed, so I get in, in the evenings for TV.

ViewsAskew
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Posts: 14943
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2004 6:37 am
Location: Chicago

Re: Sleeping Arrangements

Postby ViewsAskew » Sun Jan 14, 2018 1:17 am

This, to me, is the worst that this disease can do - hurt our closest relationships!

I did what he did for awhile, but my partner, like you, was determined to find a way we could sleep together. And I am glad he persisted. As Steve noted, the split king is one answer. And, if I remember correctly, there is cover you can put over it to keep it together and reduce the feeling of the space between them. Not sure it works well...just have seen them.

We opted for a second option - memory foam. Memory foam isolates movements, so I can kick away, get up, move around, come back, get up again, all night long and he is never disturbed.

Maybe take him bed shopping and see how he responds to it. Once we laid on the memory foam and I mimicked the kicking and moving and it didn't have any effect on him, I was sold.
Ann - Take what you need, leave the rest

Managing Your RLS

Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation, and are not medical advice.

Polar Bear
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Joined: Tue Dec 26, 2006 4:34 pm
Location: N. Ireland

Re: Sleeping Arrangements

Postby Polar Bear » Sun Jan 14, 2018 11:29 am

I always start the night off in the same bed as my husband and we have a memory foam mattress. He never complains about my moving or kicking. However, I rarely would lie in bed with my rls symptoms. As soon as they start I get up. Also when my medications are working well it is not always the creepy crawlies that get me up, it is the insomnia.

I get up for a while. When considering going back to bed I'd often go to the guest room where I may or may not fall asleep. Generally I will be back in our own bed before we are getting up for the day. He knows I'm off walkabout during the night and that I could be asleep or reading in one of several options. :)

Getting in and out of our bedroom silently is more of a problem, a couple of squeaky boards beneath the carpet. And the more I try to tippy-toe out of the room the more likely I am to bump into the drawer chest/chair/etc.
Betty
http://www.willis-ekbom.org/about-rls-wed/publications
Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation

stjohnh
Posts: 335
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2016 3:13 pm
Location: Palo Alto, California

Re: Sleeping Arrangements

Postby stjohnh » Sun Jan 14, 2018 7:15 pm

StirCrazy wrote:...I really don't know what to do; he will not go to the doctor, take meds, etc.


There are effective treatments for RLS. Unfortunately, many doctors don't know how to treat it. Perhaps he might join this group and learn how to get more effective treatment. I also wonder if he is depressed, he sounds like he has given up, a common sign of depression. Most people without RLS really don't get how terrible this disease can be. He may feel very alone. Happily, if he gets on this forum, he will find lots of support from people who "get it."
Blessings,
Holland


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