Another year of relief

Here you can share your experiences with substances that are ingested, inhaled, or otherwise consumed for the purpose of relieving RLS/WED, other than prescription medications. For example, herbal remedies, nutritional supplements, diet, kratom, and marijuana (for now) should be discussed here. Tell others of successes, failures, side effects, and any known research on these substances. [Posts on these subjects created prior to 2009 are in the Physical Treatments forum.]

Important: Posts and information in this section are based on personal experiences and recommendations; they should not be considered a substitute for the advice of a healthcare provider.
dixielee
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 12:54 pm

Re: Another year of relief

Postby dixielee » Tue Aug 01, 2017 2:01 am

This thread is very interesting and I would like some more information please. Is there a website that lists food that are high oxalate foods? Also what is the recommended level of oxalate those with RLS should have?
Thanks for sharing your stories. I love to hear good news!

Always hopeful, but sleepy tonight
Dixielee

pamhb
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue May 01, 2007 1:11 am
Location: Canada

Re: Another year of relief

Postby pamhb » Sat Sep 16, 2017 6:34 pm

Interesting. I have felt for a while now that my triggers consist of a peculiar group of foods, but that it was very difficult to sort out the culprits without a laborious and difficult elimination and re-introduction process. For example, I began to feel that fresh fruit is an issue, but I couldn't easily tell which fruits were the culprit. However, looking at the foods that give me problems, I can see that many of them fall into the high to moderate oxalate categories. It's certainly worth giving a try!

badnights
Moderator
Posts: 4791
Joined: Tue Mar 10, 2009 4:20 pm
Location: Northwest Territories, Canada

Re: Another year of relief

Postby badnights » Mon Sep 18, 2017 1:31 am

I'm intrigued by the apparent coincidence of high oxalate with high glutamate in foods, since glutamate in a certain part of our brains seems to be in overabundance. I'm not suggesting that there's a link between consumed glutamate and brain glutamate - in fact, I would think the body would be in deep trouble if there weren't some sort of feedback mechanism preventing absorption of substances that are already at sufficiently high levels in the body. But maybe our feedback control is faulty.

I heard something else interesting, that the most abundant amino acid in gluten (one of the main proteins in wheat) is glutamic acid, which is converted into glutamate in our bodies. Somebody had a theory (perhaps there was real science behind it, but I only read a summary) that whole foods (raw and/or minimally processed foods) contain unbroken protein molecules that get digested into peptide chains that get eliminated if we have enough of the amino acids they contain, but broken down and absorbed if we don't; whereas highly processed foods contain freed-up amino acids such as glutamic acid, which get immediately absorbed whether we need them or not, short-circuiting the feedback control.
Beth - Wishing you all restful sleep tonight
WED/RLS AUGMENTATION:
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=6532&p=61601#p61601
Discussion Board Moderator's posts don't reflect the RLS Foundation's opinion & are not medical advice

ViewsAskew
Moderator
Posts: 15059
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2004 6:37 am
Location: Chicago

Re: Another year of relief

Postby ViewsAskew » Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:47 pm

Interesting, Beth.

My husband has celiac - haven't followed the research as much lately... What I recall is that they know from blood tests that it is now 1 in 100 (average) in Europe and the US. Ireland, IIRC, is 1 in 70. Italy is also higher than average.

They also know that - through testing stored blood from US soldiers in WWII - that is was 1 in 5000 in the 1940s. We had been eating processed food for quite awhile at that time, though less processed for many than what followed in the 50s and 60s. Research also shows that particle size and the degree to which we process any food creates many changes in our bodies, including insulin response. Would be very interesting if particle size alone were at least partially responsible for some o this.
Ann - Take what you need, leave the rest

Managing Your RLS

Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation, and are not medical advice.

pamhb
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue May 01, 2007 1:11 am
Location: Canada

Re: Another year of relief

Postby pamhb » Mon Sep 18, 2017 5:50 pm

I think that the whole issue of food-related triggers is the most perplexing and the most frustrating for all of us. As a group, we know that something is triggering our bad nights, which is not present on our good nights. The problem is that what we identify as potential triggers is so disparate and so different for each of us, that it is difficult to find a single theory that links them all together. We need nutritionists and biochemists to take an interest in researching this disease, so that we can get to the bottom of this...

In the meantime, I'm operating on the theory that my triggers are both biochemical and physical.

-- Drugs and supplements are fairly easy to identify -- anything that jacks up serotonin or suppresses dopamine is going to be a problem.
-- Physical triggers, at least for me, seem to be related to blood circulation -- anything that hampers or suppresses blood circulation to the point of potential hypoxia will act as a physical trigger. Preliminary studies indicate that our disease has an effect on blood circulation to the lower legs, with resulting hypoxia in muscle tissues. Increasing circulation to the legs generally has a positive benefit. Similarly, trigger points in muscle tissue can, if left unattended, result in poor blood circulation in that tissue to the point of hypoxia. I have RLS in my shoulder and upper thigh which seems to originate from particular trigger points. Work on releasing those trigger points has a positive, albeit temporary, effect.
-- The final area is that of food. People on this board have had moderate to good success with two or three different diets, whether it's the Wahl diet, FODMAP, and now low oxalates. What do these diets have in common that we don't yet understand? What are the areas of overlap, and why? We are what we eat...

ViewsAskew
Moderator
Posts: 15059
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2004 6:37 am
Location: Chicago

Re: Another year of relief

Postby ViewsAskew » Mon Sep 18, 2017 11:54 pm

I want food to work...I do think we need to be careful teasing this out. We hear positive things from so few of us, percentage wise. We have no idea if others simply do not try it or if it hasn't worked for them...or if those who believe in diet think it works better than it does!
Ann - Take what you need, leave the rest



Managing Your RLS



Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation, and are not medical advice.

pamhb
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue May 01, 2007 1:11 am
Location: Canada

Re: Another year of relief

Postby pamhb » Wed Sep 20, 2017 1:02 pm

So I cautiously began the oxalate diet by taking out high oxalate foods and limiting moderate oxalate foods. No spectacular results, but I wasn't really expecting anything right off the bat. Yesterday I re-introduced dairy, which I haven't eaten in about a year. I had a small glass of milk around noon. And sadly, it triggered a heavy attack of RLS last night. Dairy is on the "safe" list for oxalates. While I suppose it is theoretically possible for me to have both dairy and oxalates as triggers, I am a bit skeptical. I may continue this a bit longer to see where it takes me, but clearly a low oxalate diet, by itself, is not the answer for me.,,

badnights
Moderator
Posts: 4791
Joined: Tue Mar 10, 2009 4:20 pm
Location: Northwest Territories, Canada

Re: Another year of relief

Postby badnights » Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:12 am

Ann wrote:Research also shows that particle size and the degree to which we process any food creates many changes in our bodies, including insulin response. Would be very interesting if particle size alone were at least partially responsible for some o this.
This makes sense to me.

pam wrote: I had a small glass of milk around noon. And sadly, it triggered a heavy attack of RLS last night. Dairy is on the "safe" list for oxalates. While I suppose it is theoretically possible for me to have both dairy and oxalates as triggers, I am a bit skeptical. I may continue this a bit longer to see where it takes me, but clearly a low oxalate diet, by itself, is not the answer for me.,,
Casein (one of the main proteins in milk) is 20% glutamic acid - the most abundant of 18 components. No idea if that's significant. Just throwing out ideas, not gathering them into theories.
Beth - Wishing you all restful sleep tonight
WED/RLS AUGMENTATION:
viewtopic.php?f=5&t=6532&p=61601#p61601
Discussion Board Moderator's posts don't reflect the RLS Foundation's opinion & are not medical advice


Return to “Non-prescription Medicines, Supplements, Diet”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: veldon75 and 1 guest