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Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:26 am
by Yankiwi
cbd oil is not available in New Zealand either—grrr.

Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Tue Nov 06, 2018 12:24 pm
by Polar Bear
It is sold here as a Food Supplement. With regard to general health issues (not including RLS) I read of good results and I read of no difference. But hey, I'll have a go. This from the lady who put a bar of soap in her bed :crazy:

Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 3:30 am
by Yankiwi
Knowing it wouldn't work, I too put a bar of soap in my bed.

Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:18 am
by Polar Bear
Yankiwi --
:crazy: :crazy: :lol:

Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 7:44 am
by ViewsAskew
Yankiwi wrote:Knowing it wouldn't work, I too put a bar of soap in my bed.


My husband put one there years ago...and he is a TOTAL nerd - engineer, sciency-type, who believes only in evidence.

Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Wed May 29, 2019 4:14 am
by Bridgercan
When yoga, stretching, Ancient Minerals Magnesium salt bath(s), Trader Joe’s Well Rested tea (HAHA!) all fail to calm breakout symptoms or even just my mind, a good ol’ hit of carbs will usually provide me a few hours of relief. Not good for the waistline for sure, but when faced with symptoms breaking through my current drug regimen (Horizant/Neupro/Oxy) some toast, an English muffin, some pasta or rice will do the trick, slathered in butter thank you very much. Refined sugar is one of my top three RLS triggers, but strangely, starch in one of these forms will often calm things enough to allow me a few hours of rest or even sleep when symptoms are severe.

I vaguely recall reading somewhere a post or article explaining how eating carbs might help with RLS symptoms but can’t remember where. Could’ve been posted here somewhere—ring a bell for anyone?

Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Wed May 29, 2019 4:21 am
by Bridgercan
Polar Bear wrote:These last couple of nights/mornings I gave up on the calming.
Two mornings ago I did some ironing starting at 4.30 am.

This morning I was making an old fashioned (from the 70s) pudding that I remembered, using ginger snap biscuits, tinned crushed pineapple, cream and sherry. It was assembled and in the fridge at 6am. My plan was to go back to bed and what with one thing and another I didn't make it. Let's hope the pudding is as good as I recall it.

Ginger Log - Quickly dip a ginger biscuit into sherry (or whatever) lay it flat, put on a teaspoonful of whipped double cream (get a 250ml carton) and a little crushed pineapple. When you've stacked about 6, lay them on their side. do some more, keep going until the packet is finished. Mine had about 16 biscuits. You've got your log shape and cover it with the remaining fresh cream. I've got some halved red grapes for decoration. Also opened a tin of raspberries, drained and stirred to a puree, these will make a tiny puddle on each plate.
I did a few at the end in orange juice to be more suitable for the children.
I'm thinking if I slice it at an angle it will show layers/lines. We will see.



Ironing—I love it! Will have to try that: standing, moving around, mindless, and getting something done in the middle of the night—perfect for this RLS-er!

Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Wed May 29, 2019 4:42 am
by Yankiwi
Many years ago when a tooth flared up on a Sunday night and I needed an emergency root canal filling I stayed up almost all night ironing and cleaning. The pain was still there but working frantically took my mind off of it. Luckily my dentist took me first thing on Monday.

Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:11 am
by badnights
I vaguely recall reading somewhere a post or article explaining how eating carbs might help with RLS symptoms but can’t remember where. Could’ve been posted here somewhere—ring a bell for anyone?

I've read that carbs help with sleep by stimulating reward systems in the brain somehow. Sleep, not WED.

I sometimes seem unable to stop myself from eating when I get up in the night; usually it's carbs I want or eat. Sometimes I'm up from WED and sometimes from general insomnia, so I'm not sure the carbs are helping the WED at all. What's wierd (for me) is that I never say no to the urge to eat when it happens in the middle of the night. I'm sure I won't be able to sleep unless I eat! I've never in recent memory tested that - I've always felt that I could easily not eat, but I always - always - eat anyway, telling myself I can't afford not to sleep. (Even though I think late eating is messing with my circadian clocks and feel quite motivated to fix that.)

Re: What Calms You in the Night?

Posted: Mon Jun 03, 2019 6:26 am
by Bridgercan
badnights wrote:
I vaguely recall reading somewhere a post or article explaining how eating carbs might help with RLS symptoms but can’t remember where. Could’ve been posted here somewhere—ring a bell for anyone?

I've read that carbs help with sleep by stimulating reward systems in the brain somehow. Sleep, not WED.

I sometimes seem unable to stop myself from eating when I get up in the night; usually it's carbs I want or eat. Sometimes I'm up from WED and sometimes from general insomnia, so I'm not sure the carbs are helping the WED at all. What's wierd (for me) is that I never say no to the urge to eat when it happens in the middle of the night. I'm sure I won't be able to sleep unless I eat! I've never in recent memory tested that - I've always felt that I could easily not eat, but I always - always - eat anyway, telling myself I can't afford not to sleep. (Even though I think late eating is messing with my circadian clocks and feel quite motivated to fix that.)


OMG, Badnights—you describe my situation exactly when I’m in a bad symptom phase! Like tonight: climbed into bed, felt drowsy, then boom, symptoms hit. Got up, began reading, got hungry, and just wolfed down a bowl of spaghetti. Like you, I don’t put much effort into saying no to eating, I kinda justify it my head too about needing sleep, etc, and promise myself in the morning I’ll put in another 20 minutes on the bike, which I usually do.

Symptoms have abated some but I think I’ll have to dose with a smidge more oxy, and take a magnesium salt bath to pass the time until it kicks in. Cheers!