Shoes

For everything and anything else not covered in the other RLS sections.
ctravel12
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shoes

Post by ctravel12 »

Hi Randy I am so sorry for what you are going through. I know that my hubby had bone spurs on his feet and he got some orthotics which has helped tremendously; however he does not have rls. I was going to mention about the orthotics but saw that D4 mentioned that to you.

I wish I was more help to you. I really hope that you find the relief that you so much need.

I know when my feet get hot, I stand on the tile floor and really helps. I also sleep with my feet out of of the sheets/blankets as I cannot stand hot feet.

Good luck Randy, and please let us know how you are doing.
Charlene
Taking one day at a time

Walking After Midnight
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Post by Walking After Midnight »

Thanks Charlene.

I guess my wife and I are just not the foot massage types. It just doesn't sound fun OR relaxing to swap foot massages. Maybe I'm wrong, and missing out on something...but I will have to live without a foot massage.
Is that stubborn? I don't know. heh. Maybe someone makes some kind of foot massager?

But thanks for the suggestions and the shoe info.

ViewsAskew
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Post by ViewsAskew »

Yep, just buy one. It's a machine and you stick your tootsies, etc. into it. Marvelous and you don't have to reciprocate.

I had spurs a while back, Randy that cause plantar fasciitis. It hurt for about a year. I tried everything - orthotics, massage, special shoes, special exercises, etc. Nothing seemed to help and it really was pretty awful. It just sort of went away on it's own.

I hope you get a handle on yours soon. I remember how miserable it was.
Ann - Take what you need, leave the rest

Managing Your RLS

Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation, and are not medical advice.

KBear
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Post by KBear »

I just found this old thread. Intersting that so many of us also have foot pain. I'm dealing with plantars facitis (heel and arch pain) myself right now.

I had started a daily walking program in April. I was walking 3-5 miles per day and I was really enjoying it as was my dog, but I didn't last more than two weeks, now my feet hurt so bad that I can't walk more than a block at a time. I'm icing at night doing tennis ball/golf ball exercises and hoping they get better so I don't spend all summer sitting around the house. I'm also seeing a chiroprator for neck pain that started in the same time frame and he's working on my feet as well.

This all started at the same time as my recent RLS spiral (5 straight nights of no sleep) and I'm wondering if the pain and the RLS are all connected to the same problem. Do any of you think that your foot pain (or any other pain that does not seem to be "RLS leg Pain") could be connected to the RLS.

Until now I just hought I had a bunch of different random problems all happening at the same time; RLS, foot pain, and neck pain. I'm only 45 but I feel like an old lady.
Kathy

Link to the Mayo Clinic Algorithm:

http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.com/pd ... 907Crc.pdf

doety
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related

Post by doety »

Kathy, I think a lot of the pains are related. I have arthritis and I know when that gets bad, so does the RLS. Something else I wonder about is that all this stuff seemed to happen at menopause for me; you're not there yet. But I think I lost some kind of protection against a lot of things. My husband loves to walk and hike; I just don't do well at it. I have two hip replacements and I think that interferes some. But what I can do is bike, and I'm trying to do that everyday now that it's pretty outside. You wouldn't want to do that with your dog, but it is a way to get exercise, enjoy the outdoors and it gets your weight up off your "structure."
Sorry for your pain. I know the feeling of starting a "program," and thinking how well it's going, so much fun, finally you can do healthy things and then whammo. It's a mean, nasty disorder that can rob us of some joy.

ViewsAskew
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Post by ViewsAskew »

Yeah, I had the plantar faciitis thingl, too and it really crimped my activity level for over a year.

I was in a stretching class at my Y, led by a Chiro. He said he'd had it, too (it's very common). He said that regardless of what the doctors say, most treatments for it just do not work well. He said to keep stretching it, do the tennis ball thing, etc. but it would probably go away in its own time. It did. About 14 months I think.

During that time I gave up dance classes and instead did yoga, stretching and a LOT of biking. Weird, but even that would cause it to hurt. I've never proven it, but the whole problem started when I did some deep calf stretches, as guided by my Commit to be Fit instructor at the Y. I couldn't do those stretches for a long time without pain. Even now, two years after healing, I can still feel pain in my foot if I do those - so I don't (do them, that is).
Ann - Take what you need, leave the rest

Managing Your RLS

Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation, and are not medical advice.

Sojourner
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Post by Sojourner »

WAM, Getting in on this a bit late but I also went through about an 18 month plantar facitis period. If that is what it is, as others have said, it is a slow healing type of injury/condition. Be sure to be very careful with any stretching as it is an easy condition to aggravate. PT helped me some. However, as far as shoe inserts, my best was a pair of custom made orthos made of cork. They were suggested by the father of my podiatrist (who is/was also a podiatrist) after the initial orthos of some harder material did not work out. I know custom orthos are expensive but, looking back, they were a very good investment considering the pain. The cork was light, "not too hard, not too soft javascript:emoticon(':lol:'), and very easy to custom fit. Anyway, not sure of your insurance etc. but just thought I'd add my 2 cents. Best of Luck.
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Walking After Midnight
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Post by Walking After Midnight »

Thanks Mark, thanks everyone.
I'm gonna look that "plantars" thing up.

You guys ever have a feeling in your foot/feet like you have a pebble in your shoe...only you aint wearing shoes?
I get that all the time. Walking around the house...it bugs me to death. And when I sit down and put my foot up and feel around, there's no lump or anything but I stand back up and take a few steps, it feels like I have a big lump on the bottom of my foot. Weird aint it?

dogeyed
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Post by dogeyed »

Dear Walking,
That "pebble" might be a bone "spur," which is an arthritic growth that sticks out from the bones. Yours may come from irritation of that part of the foot. You can buy a little cushion bandaid type thing for that area, like for bunions, at the drugstore. Also, sole inserts provide some comfort, which the natural foot cushion gets thinner with aging feet. Arch supports take some pressure off the foot bones, too. But NO QUESTION you need a better boot, which this thread suggested several brands.

You can massage your own feet. It doesn't feel as good as when someone else does it, but you get the same result. I used to soak the hot soles of my feet in a cool pan of water as soon as I got home from work and took my shoes off. Wool socks will wick away dampness in a shoe. A friend of mine said Sketcher tennis shoes cured her feet. Policemen who walk the beat, they wear special shoes, I think.

Cement floors are indeed destructive to the feet. I worked at a place with cement floors and most everyone there had a podiatrist they went to. Usually places of work with hard floors will have rubber mats in places where people stand. Another issue, I had a pair of old Reebok tennis shoes one time that I used for yard work. I did not realize that a sole nail had come through at the heel. I have nerve damage there.

According to my neurologist and this website, restless legs are apparently caused by a multitude of things, but I've always thought mine came from my feet. I fell down in the driveway one time and almost broke my foot. Within a very short time, I developed RLS. The same low dose of tylenol with codeine controls it for me for three years now.

Oh, and I know all about that hot searing pain in the feet. It is sheer agony. I would come home from work and roll around on the couch for an hour before the pain would lighten up. My feet seemed to hurt worse once I got off them.

I would like to hear how you're doing with your feet. And of course anyone else who has hurting feet, please post. I think they have done polls here that try to find a common denominator for RLS. I personally think it's the feet. Maybe one of the moderators can give a percentage on that deal?

ViewsAskew
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Post by ViewsAskew »

I don't recall any stats (medical) about the feet and RLS, nor it listed as a secondary cause. It's such a hard thing to separate as feet problems are so common in the non-RLS population, too. Especially as we age. I can only speak for my family (more than half of us have RLS) and say that none of us had feet things before RLS and that I am the only one I know of to have feet things. But, that is primary, not secondary. Maybe there is a link and it's been missed, though. Especially between those who have had injury.
Ann - Take what you need, leave the rest

Managing Your RLS

Opinions presented by Discussion Board Moderators are personal in nature and do not, in any way, represent the opinion of the RLS Foundation, and are not medical advice.

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